The COVID pandemic accelerates the problem of resistance to antibiotics

No need to use antibiotics to treat COVID-19 patients and to interfere with prevention and control of infertility practices (Getty Images)
No need to use antibiotics to treat COVID-19 patients and to interfere with prevention and control of infertility practices (Getty Images)

The problem of resistance to antimicrobials is registered as an antidote to pandemic due to the automation of individuals, but to prescriptions of injectable drugs, and to the administration of drugs in animals, among other reasons.

The embargo, the crisis due to the emergence of public health that produces COVID-19 in the world influenced more by the resistance of the antibiotics. Following a scientific study evaluating the impact of 271 hospitals in the United States, hospitalized patients with the pandemic presented with the highest rates of antibacterial and antibiotic-resistant infections.

The results of the work are presented in the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Dermatoses (ECCMID) which is realized in Lisbon, Portugal.

In 2019, 1.2 million people died worldwide due to infertility resistant to antibiotics, and this figure is multiplied by 2050. The COVID-19 pandemic presents many challenges for the appropriateness of antibiotics and administration.

Early studies suggest that coronavirus disruption is associated with secondary infections with antimicrobial resistance, possibly due to the use of antibiotics to treat COVID-19 patients and the interventions of their prevention and control practices in these unhealthy saline systems.

In 2019, 1.2 million people died worldwide due to infertility resistant to antibiotics, and this figure is multiplied by 2050 (Getty)
In 2019, 1.2 million people died worldwide due to infertility resistant to antibiotics, and this figure is multiplied by 2050 (Getty)

The study was conducted by Dr. Karri Bauer, of the MSD pharmaceutical company, and Dr. Vikas Gupta, of the medical technology company Becton Dickinson. It detects that drug-resistant infections are significantly worse in the cases that are being treated in hospitals during the pandemic.

After concluding, these are sub-indications of the importance of following the impact of COVID-19 on the antimicrobial resistance bowl, according to investigators. Por eso, to report more of the problem, how to perform a multicenter and retrospective cohort analysis of all adults (18 years or older) enrolled in 271 United States Homes before and during the COVID-19 pandemic a day in the hospital and only a high or dead record.

Patients are classified at the time of admission: before the pandemic (from July 1, 2019 to February 29, 2020), or during the pandemic (from March 1, 2020 to October 30, 2021), and function of your COVID-19 stage (with a positive coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 result defined by a positive PCR or antigen probe in up to 7 days in anterior or posterior hospitalization).

It registers all inclusions with the same inertia but resistance to antimicrobials, which is defined as a positive primer for determining pathogenic gram-negative pathogens or antibiotic-resistant pathogens or antibiotics.

Investigators evaluate the resistances at 100 inches above and during the COVID pandemicexamining your pharmacist-resistant infections by entering the community within the initiation (defined as a reciprocal treatment of 2 days deprived of English) or the dentist of the hospital (more than 2 children deprived of English).

See a study on patients enrolled in 271 United States Hospitals before and during the COVID-19 pandemic (REUTERS / Mike Blake)
See a study on patients enrolled in 271 United States Hospitals before and during the COVID-19 pandemic (REUTERS / Mike Blake)

In total, 1,789,458 patients were admitted to the hospital during the prepaid period and 3,729,208 during the pandemic. The number of patients admitted to the hospital with some infertility due to resistance to antimicrobials ranged from 63,263 during the preparatory period. In exchange, there were 129,410 during the pandemic.

The analysis revealed that the wind resistance cup was 3.54 by 100 inches against the pandemic and 3.47 by 100 inches during the pandemic. Under embargo, patients who test positive or negative for COVID-19 test higher levels of resistance than patients during the pandemic: 4.92 for every 100 inches and 4.11 for every 100 inches, respectively.

In case of hospital infections, the resistance cup was 0.77 per 100 inches against the pandemic and 0.86 per 100 inches during the pandemic, and the maximum was 2.19 per 100 inches per patient with COVID-19. When analyzing the infections originating in the community, the resistance cup of the antimicrobials ranged from 2.76 per 100 ingres during the prepaid period, and 2.61 per 100 ingres during the pandemic.

“These new data point to the import of vigilantes around the impact of COVID-19 on their antimicrobial resistance bases,” affirms the doctor Bauer. It is especially worrying that antibiotic resistance has been shown to persist well in pandemics in both positive and negative COVID-19 patients. Infections acquired in the hospital are a major concern, with resilience and antimicrobial resistance significantly higher than the pandemic that precedes ”, advirtió.

The authors point out that it is necessary to carry out an additional evaluation of the impact of the pandemic on antimicrobial resistance: “As the capacity of sanitary attenuation is always in the mind of all, the vital import series takes the pulse of the immediate impact of the infections resistant to the drugs”sostuvo Gupta.

Antibiotic resistance during the pandemic was present in all patients as positive as COVID-19 (iStock)
Antibiotic resistance during the pandemic was present in all patients as positive as COVID-19 (iStock)

“This type of data and vigilance is adjusted to accountable sanitizers and identify unnecessary resources to approve antimicrobial administration programs, and to adjust to a more detailed and sophisticated version of the trends,” he said. As the study hiccups to limit hospitality, the opinion states that it is necessary to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on the resistance of antimicrobials in other ways to monitor the problem.

How to inform Infobae in February, in Argentina, the antidote to the problem of resistance to antimicrobials increased by 10 years. At the time of the pandemic, a vein producing 2% of the number of resistant bacteria affected in the hospital’s patients was hospitalized. In exchange, during the first year of the pandemic, 30% of the number of bacteria resistant in hospitals was produced.según informó a Infobae the fine-grained organization Antibiotic Resistance Investigation (INVERA), which is the nucleus of specialists in infectology and biochemistry.

“The situation of the problem of resistance to antimicrobials, as well as antibiotics, is aggravated by the pandemic in Argentina. The problem is that patients can acquire infections with resistant bacteria that have a mortality rate of 10 ves more than a comparison with a heart attack. “advirtió en dialogo con Infobae the infectious disease doctor Francisco Nacinovich, director of INVERA.

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